Larry Bird’s offseason moves aren’t going to win back the Pacers’ fanbase, but they may save his job.

Just think ... after two more long seasons, the Pacers will no longer be spending a third of their salary on these two clowns.

Just think ... after two more long seasons, the Pacers will no longer be spending a third of their salary on these two clowns.

For the first time in a long time, the Pacers have gone nearly a year without making any foolish decisions.

In fact, every move Bird has made since the end of the 2008-09 season has been exactly what the team needs.

Bird decided not to pay $7 million-plus to retain Marquis Daniels. He didn’t match an offer the Toronto Raptors made to Jarrett Jack for about $5 million a year over four years.

Instead, Bird signed former Denver shooting guard Dahntay Jones to a four-year deal worth only about $2.6 million per season. He later inked former New Orleans point guard Earl Watson for a one-year $2.8 million deal.

Bird finally bit the bullet and sent Jamaal Tinsley on his way, buying out his contract for $10.7 million – saving the Pacers $4 million in cap room over the next two seasons. It also spared the team an arbitration case it was destined to lose.

Additionally, the Pacers signed two serviceable dirt-cheap free agent power forwards – Josh McRoberts and Solomon Jones.

Of course, Bird had little choice.

Despite all the cost cutting moves the Pacers are still right around the salary cap. But at least Bird isn’t cripling the Pacers in the long-run, as Donnie Walsh did with virtually every move he made before his exit.

As it stands, the Pacers will finally be freed of all the terrible contracts they’ve signed and took on over the last few years following the 2010-11 season.

At that point, they will only have $15 million in salary – that accounting for Danny Granger ($12 million) and Jones ($3 million) – and team options on Brandon Rush, Roy Hibbert, and Tyler Hansboro (all for less than $3 million a piece).

But two big questions loom – will Bird, or the Pacers themselves, still be in Indiana to see salary cap freedom?

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