The Heisman trophy is supposed to be awarded to the “most outstanding football player.”

The last defensive player since Charles Woodson in '97 to win the Heisman? Leon Hart in 1949 of course.

The last defensive player since Charles Woodson in '97 to win the Heisman? Leon Hart in 1949 of course.

Yet in the 73 years it’s exsisted, just three times has it been given to a defensive player. Since 1950, only once did a defensive player receive the honor – cornerback Charles Woodson in 1997.

And since 2000, it’s become exclusive to quarterbacks with only Reggie Bush (2005) breaking the mold this decade.

Making matters worst, most of the quarterbacks who receive the honor have already been forgotten.

Case in point, Jason White. Yeah, he won it in 2003 beating out Larry Fitzgerald.

In 2000, Chirs Weinke won the award. Josh Heupel was the runner up.

Eric freakin Crouch won the award in 2001. The next four point getters? Don’t laugh – Rex Grossman, Ken Dorsey, Joey Harrington, and David Carr.

Matt Leinart won over Adrian Peterson in 2004. Troy Smith got it over Darren McFadden in 2006.

So here we are in 2008 and guess what … three quarterbacks will be at the Heisman ceremony Saturday.

When it comes to college football, I’m no expert and I’m not a stat geek. But I’m guessing that since 1950, Woodson wasn’t the only defensive player worthy of the Heisman. I’m pretty sure outstanding defenses with special players have carried teams to greatness during that time span.

I’d also venture to say that since 2000, the college quarterback hasn’t become the only position player worthy of this award.

It’s time to rethink the nomination process and get back to what the award was meant to represent in the first place – the “most outstanding football player.”

Not the most outstanding offensive player, not the most outstanding quarterback … the most outstanding football player.

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