A dreaded tie and an instant replay butchering have brought about some questions for the NFL this week.

The Eagles and Bengals “battled” to a tie Sunday, after the 15-minute overtime period expired. There can’t be ties in professional football, period. It hasn’t happened since 2002, but once every six seasons is still too often.

Two challenges from this blogger. I challenge the tie rule and what on Earth the replay officials were doing in Pittsburgh.

Two challenges from this blogger. I challenge the tie rule and what on Earth the replay officials were doing in Pittsburgh.

Suggestion: Get rid of sudden death and play a full 15-minute quarter. Leader at the end of 15 minutes wins the game. If it’s still tied, play additional 10-minute quarters until someone leads at the end of one. Also, teams must go for 2-point conversions if they score a touchdown to help prevent double and triple overtimes.

Additionally, how did professional football players not know ties were possible? Are you kidding me? I think I knew that rule when I was 7. Have they ever taken a glance at the NFL standings?

Bookies and gamblers all over the world either got very lucky or were forever scarred by the end of the Pittsburgh/San Diego game Sunday.

On the final play of the game, the Chargers – trailing 11-10 with seconds remaining, in their own territory, with no timeouts – started lateraling the ball. Every lateral was legal, none were even close to forward laterals.

The ball finally ended up in Troy Polamalu’s hands and he rumbled into the endzone. This matters for gambling degenerates (and the sure-fire picks) because the Steelers should have won 18-10. They were favored by 5.

Inexplicably, the play was reviewed and it was determined there was an illegal forward lateral, and the touchdown was somehow wiped off the board. The call was clearly, clearly wrong. After the game, it was quickly determined it was the wrong call.

For those that had the Steelers giving five points. Sorry.

For anyone that watched the final play, the replay, and the overturn … something seemed fishy. It was just too blatantly incorrect.

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